"Idols, good grief! They're everywhere. Bigger biceps, bigger diamonds, more diamonds, bigger paychecks, bigger houses, a newer car, faster car, you know, one more pair of shoes."

Family Discussions:

  1. How do material things become idols?
  2. Can you identify with things that have become idols to you?
  3. How do we get out of the, "I want a little bit more" trip?

Transcription:

00:14 Today I want to tell you about the richest kids in the world and interestingly enough, all they have everyday is one bowl of beans and rice but they're the richest kids I know. We're in First Timothy Chapter six verses six through 10 and it says this, "but godliness is actually a means of great gain when accompanied by contentment for we have brought nothing into the world. So we cannot take anything out of the world either. If we have food and covering with these, we shall be content. But those who want to get rich fall into temptation and snare and many foolish and harmful desires, which plunge men into ruin and destruction for the love of money is the root of all sorts of evil. And some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." Idols good grief.

01:16 They're everywhere. Bigger biceps, bigger diamonds, more diamonds, bigger paychecks, bigger houses, a newer car, faster car, you know, one more pair of shoes. Uh, you know, I think kind of the big black hole in America that we absorb enough resources to easily feed the rest of the starving world. And we still need more to be happy. It's crazy isn't it? You know, more, you know, give me more, I want more. What happened to enough already? You know, these wonderful Kamps that I get to work with. You know, we've, we've adopted these 18 schools in Haiti and we've got these 6,000 kids that we get to take care of it and these precious kids have got one shirt and one pair of shoes and they'll wear the shirt the whole year, taken home at night, wash it, and they look great every single day. They get one bowl of beans and rice for lunch and some of them, that's their meal for the day.

02:18 That's it. That's all they've ever known and they are thrilled to death to get it. You know, who do you think is the happiest? American kids or Haitian kids? You know, honestly, I've seen more smiles in Haiti than I have in America. In some way, they're more content and happy. I've never seen the Haitian kids fight or shoot each other, threaten a teacher or call each other, their parents degrading names, never in all my trips down there. On the other end, I just meet so many, you know, kids in our country, you know, who really love God, who would give the shirt off their back to someone in need. I see that in some super grateful American kids. In fact I believe these, you know, which some people call Gen X kids have more representatives that are even less materialistic than the generation that proceeded them.

03:13 And you know what, for me that is so encouraging as I work with kids. We've got these kids at our Kamp who will pack 6,000 Christmas bags and we'll take Christmas gifts to the kids in Haiti. And I see kids excited about going to Africa and mission trips like never before. Because the bottom line is that material things become idols. And I think our kids are seeing that, you know, anything material that you and I wouldn't give up in a heartbeat to someone who needed it worse is probably becoming an idol. And you know what, man? Things don't satisfy. You can never have enough. That's why scripture puts such a high price on contentment. It's one commodity you just can't get enough of. And here's the questions for today. How do material things become idols? And then, uh, and then secondly, can you identify with things that have become idols to you? And then the third question today is, how do we get out of the, "I want a little bit more" trip? And the lifeline today is this: Material things always leave you wanting more, but contentment satisfies always.

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